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Great Expectations – Charles Dickens

Widely regarded as his finest work, Charles Dickens’ quintessential Victorian coming-of-age tale, Great Expectations was originally published in serial form between December 1860 and August 1861. In response to contemporary literary criticism asserting that the story was “too sad”, Dickens later rewrote the ending. In keeping with literary tradition, this volume follows the 1874 edition, published as a full-length novel with the modified ending and accepted as the “standard,” and widely known, classic version. The tale follows the life of an orphan named Pip from ...    Read More >



The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus – L. Frank Baum

Taking the beloved symbol of merriment out of his conventional trappings and into the world of imaginative folklore, Baum gives Santa Claus an exciting life that evokes all the charm, warmth, and fantasy that made his Oz stories American classics. Lyman Frank Baum was born in Chittenango, New York, on May 15, 1856. Over the course of his life, Baum raised fancy poultry, sold fireworks, managed an opera house, opened a department store, and an edited a newspaper before finally turning to writing. In 1900, ...    Read More >



Look Homeward, Angel – Thomas Wolfe

The spectacular, history-making first novel about a young man’s coming of age by literary legend Thomas Wolfe, first published in 1929 and long considered a classic of twentieth century literature. A legendary author on par with William Faulkner and Flannery O’Connor, Thomas Wolfe published Look Homeward, Angel, his first novel, about a young man’s burning desire to leave his small town and tumultuous family in search of a better life, in 1929. It gave the world proof of his genius and launched a powerful legacy. ...    Read More >



The Prince – Nicolo Machiavelli

THE PRINCE (Italian: Il Principe) is a 16th-century political treatise by the Italian diplomat and political theorist Niccolò Machiavelli. From correspondence a version appears to have been distributed in 1513, using a Latin title, De Principatibus (About Principalities). However, the printed version was not published until 1532, five years after Machiavelli’s death. This was done with the permission of the Medici pope Clement VII, but “long before then, in fact since the first appearance of the Prince in manuscript, controversy had swirled about his writings”. ...    Read More >



Frankenstein – Mary Shelley

Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, generally known as Frankenstein, is a novel written by the British author Mary Shelley. The title of the novel refers to a scientist, Victor Frankenstein, who learns how to create life and creates a being in the likeness of man, but larger than average and more powerful. In popular culture, people have tended to refer to the Creature as “Frankenstein”, despite this being the name of the scientist. Frankenstein is a novel infused with some elements of the Gothic novel ...    Read More >

Longbourn Revisited – Margaret Lynette Sharp

When news of Mr Bennet’s illness arrives at Pemberley, Elizabeth finds that she must set off for Longbourn without the company of her husband, Fitzwilliam Darcy, who has business in London requiring his urgent attention. What unexpected events will further disrupt the apparent harmony of Elizabeth’s life? Will Hodges, Mr Bennet’s young physician, be captivated by Catherine Bennet, thus fulfilling the desires of Mrs Bennet? Will Mary be left behind to attend to her mother’s selfish wishes?    Read More >



Angela’s Ashes – Frank McCourt

A Pulitzer Prize–winning, #1 New York Times bestseller, Angela’s Ashes is Frank McCourt’s masterful memoir of his childhood in Ireland. “When I look back on my childhood I wonder how I managed to survive at all. It was, of course, a miserable childhood: the happy childhood is hardly worth your while. Worse than the ordinary miserable childhood is the miserable Irish childhood, and worse yet is the miserable Irish Catholic childhood.” So begins the luminous memoir of Frank McCourt, born in Depression-era Brooklyn to recent ...    Read More >



Catch-22 – Joseph Heller

Since its publication in 1961, no novel has matched Catch-22’s intensity and brilliance in depicting the brutal insanity of war. Fifty years after its original publication, Catch-22 remains a cornerstone of American literature and one of the funniest—and most celebrated—novels of all time. In recent years it has been named to “best novels” lists by Time, Newsweek, the Modern Library, and the London Observer. Set in Italy during World War II, this is the story of the incomparable, malingering bombardier, Yossarian, a hero who is ...    Read More >