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Fahrenheit 451 – Ray Bradbury

Guy Montag is a fireman. In his world, where television rules and literature is on the brink of extinction, firemen start fires rather than put them out. His job is to destroy the most illegal of commodities, the printed book, along with the houses in which they are hidden.     Read More >





The Return of the Native – Thomas Hardy

Edgon Heath is a mystical place where life is not at all ordinary and simple. It is also the stage where the tragedy in The Return of the Native unfolds. And like any classical tragedy, the action revolves around a woman, goddess-like Eustacia Vye who searches for a way to escape the mundane.    Read More >




Don Quixote – Miguel de Cervantes

Widely regarded as the world's first modern novel, and one of the funniest and most tragic books ever written, Don Quixote chronicles the famous picaresque adventures of the noble knight-errant Don Quixote of La Mancha and his faithful squire, Sancho Panza, as they travel through sixteenth-century Spain.    Read More >



Dubliners – James Joyce

James Joyce began these stories in 1904 (he was 22), and completed them in 1907, but they remained unpublished until 1914 — victims of Edwardian squeamishness. Their vivid observations of the life of Dublin's poorer classes, unconventional themes, coarse language, and mention of actual people and places made publishers of the day reluctant.    Read More >