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Euphoria – Lily King

The bestselling novel of three young, gifted anthropologists of the ‘30’s caught in a passionate love triangle that threatens their bonds, their careers, and, ultimately, their lives. Inspired by events in the life of revolutionary anthropologist Margaret Mead, Euphoria is "dazzling ... suspenseful ... brilliant...an exhilarating novel.”—Boston Globe    Read More >



The Summer Wind – Mary Alice Monroe

The second book in Monroe’s Lowcountry Summer trilogy, following the NY Times bestselling The Summer Girls. This series is a heartwarming story of three half-sisters and their grandmother, who is determined to help them rediscover their southern roots and family bonds.     Read More >



God Help the Child – Toni Morrison

Spare and unsparing, God Help the Child—the first novel by Toni Morrison to be set in our current moment—weaves a tale about the way the sufferings of childhood can shape, and misshape, the life of the adult. A fierce and provocative novel that adds a new dimension to the matchless oeuvre of Toni Morrison.    Read More >



Blue Sun, Yellow Sky – Jamie Jo Hoang

Hailed as “One of the best technical painters of our time” by an L.A. Times critic, 27-year-old Aubrey Johnson is finally gaining traction with her work. But as she weaves through what should be a celebration of her art, a single nagging echo of her doctor’s words refuses to stay silent—there is no cure. In less than eight weeks Aubrey is going blind.    Read More >






The Wake (and What Jeremiah Did Next) – Colm Herron

2015 Summer Book Awards Winner: Colm Herron, one of Ireland’s most gifted storytellers, brings wry humour and acute insight to bear on his portrayal of Derry folk in The Wake (And What Jeremiah Did Next). The raucous human panorama unfolds through the eyes of Jeremiah. Earthy wake banter, competition for the love of a bisexual activist, and the civil rights march through Burntollet in early 1969, when violence shattered Northern Ireland’s fragile peace, are vehicles for this shrewd, sympathetic and unique commentary on the human condition.    Read More >