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Tell the Wolves I’m Home – Carol Rifka Brunt

This book is an inspirational novel that I read in the last year; Brunt's work reminds me of The Hours by Michael Cunningham, another favorite. Cunningham's work in The Hours is complex and illustrates those small moments in people's lives that intertwine in unexpected ways, but Brunt's work focuses on one particular era (the 1980s) during the AIDS crisis. The novel follows June, who gradually comes to know her uncle's lover after he dies; it is a haunting work and sure to have you ruminating about the nature of love long after you finish the last page. -- Erin F., DC Public Library staff



Orphan Train – Christina Baker Kline

The #1 New York Times Bestseller Christina Baker Kline’s Orphan Train is an unforgettable story of friendship and second chances that highlights a little-known but historically significant movement in America’s past—and it includes a special PS section for book clubs featuring insights, interviews, and more.

Whatever It Takes – Margaret Lynette Sharp

Although the London of the early 1950's holds its attractions, and love is blossoming between Lisa and her fellow trainee schoolteacher, Liam, Lisa stills nurtures resentment towards her Dad, who exiled her there from Sydney, leaving her in the care of her grandmother, six years before.



The Nightingale – Kristin Hannah

In the quiet village of Carriveau, Vianne Mauriac says goodbye to her husband, Antoine, as he heads for the Front. She doesn't believe that the Nazis will invade France...but invade they do, in droves of marching soldiers, in caravans of trucks and tanks, in planes that fill the skies and drop bombs upon the innocent. When a German captain requisitions Vianne's home, she and her daughter must live with the enemy or lose everything. Without food or money or hope, as danger escalates all around them, she is forced to make one impossible choice after another to keep her family alive.

The Sweetness – Sande Boritz Berger

Early in The Sweetness, an inquisitive young girl asks her grandmother why she is carrying nothing but a jug of sliced lemons and water when they are forced by the Germans to evacuate their ghetto. "Something sour to remind me of the sweetness," she tells her, setting the theme for what they must remember to survive.

Sisters and Rivals – Margaret Lynette Sharp

It's the early nineteen fifties, and the nascent romance of two young Sydneysiders is about to be challenged. Linda is being courted by an ambitious young carpenter named Harry. Seemingly without effort, he passes the scrutiny of her parents and they encourage her alliance with him. Trouble brews, though, when her sister Tessa lays eyes on him and, despite her engagement to a young accountant, makes her feelings abundantly clear.



The Ice Cream Queen of Orchard Street – Susan Jane Gilman

"Just like tasting your first ice cream cone, after reading the first page of this historical novel you'll be hooked. The story blends together a rich immigrant experience together with a rags to riches narrative all while remaining historically accurate. This all American story will have you reaching for a cone after the last page." - Schlow Library Staff